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addiction intervention

Addiction Intervention Planning: 5 Things You Need to Say

An addiction intervention isn’t an easy thing to do, but it’s often a necessary one. President Obama once wrote in National Drug Control Strategy that to succeed against addiction, “we will need to rely on the hard work, dedication, and perseverance of every concerned American.” For those who watch their loved ones struggle daily with addiction, these words are fire, burning through their hearts and pushing them to help those around them begin healing.

An addiction intervention takes a good deal of planning, however, as the discussion that occurs can be a tricky and touchy one. Mapping out the conversation in advance and making sure you say the right things can reduce the amount of stress for all involved and help the conversation flow more easily.

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denial

I Don’t Have A Problem: Denial and Addiction

Denial is one of the main reasons why drug addiction and alcoholism are maintained and prolonged. Many researchers argue that addiction wouldn’t be possible at all without denial. If you’re reading this, you probably know an individual who refuses to acknowledge that he or she has a problem. It’s important to understand that denial is a symptom of addiction.

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drug addiction

Signs Your Loved One is Ready to Talk About Drug Addiction Treatment

When you discover a loved one is struggling with alcohol or drug addiction, the first thing you want to do is get them some help. Seems rational, right? Most often, however, it isn’t that easy. Denial is a big part of addiction. “I don’t have a problem,” may be the reply to every attempt at a  conversation, and even after the problem is acknowledged, the person struggling may believe they can quit on their own, any time they want to.

The truth is, addiction is just as much of a lesson in powerlessness for loved ones as it is for the person in active addiction. We quickly discover that it’s not really up to us when our loved one goes to rehab. Getting help is a personal crossroad and everyone gets there “when they do.” 

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whats rehab like

What’s Rehab Like? An Addiction Treatment Overview

What’s Rehab Like? 

Your life has spiraled out of control.
You’re caught in the bondage of drug addiction or alcoholism.

If you’ve been thinking about rehab and this is all new to you, you’re probably wondering what to expect.
What’s rehab like?
Is it like a hospital?
Will I be locked in?
Will I be able to talk to my family?

I’ve been asked every one of these questions by people just like you who were ready for help but afraid of the unknown.
Having a clear picture of what rehab is like can greatly reduce the fear you may have about the process and help you feel more confident about saying yes to addiction treatment.
Here’s what you should know:

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“I Tried to Stay Sober After Detox” and Why This Doesn’t Usually Work

Staying Sober After Detox

Deciding to give up alcohol or drugs is the first step toward recovery. If you’ve been through detox, you may be wondering why you can’t just stop here. Why do you have to spend additional time in a drug treatment center —a.k.a. ‘rehab’? Will it really make all that much of a difference?
Right now, you feel good.
Your head is pretty clear and you’re able to make the right choices to keep you on the path toward recovery.
…or are you?

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chronic relapser

No One is Too Far Gone: Help for the Chronic Relapser

Helping the Chronic Relapser

Addiction can be a complicated and sometimes chronic condition. It can span through decades of a person’s life. For the chronic relapser, addiction can completely change who they are and how they live. It’s the reason so many people struggling with addiction find themselves without a job, home, friends or family. Drug seeking behavior becomes the only motivation, while everything else is cast aside. While studies show that a large number of individuals relapse within the first four years after treatment, it doesn’t have to be this way. There are steps that can be taken to help not only the one-time relapse but the chronic relapser.

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signs of heroin use

Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction

Signs of Heroin Use and Addiction

Addiction is complicated and the path to heroin use can begin with pain pills, either through self-medication or a legitimate prescription. Often, a person is prescribed vicodin, oxycontin, or other opioids after an injury, surgery or dental work. Once a person taking prescription pain pills experiences the euphoria produced by narcotic pain medication, the craving to continue taking it can lead to addiction.

We hear so many stories that begin with pain medication and end with IV drug use. Addiction doesn’t play favorites. It affects every people group and crosses all professional and socio-economic boundaries. In the past 10 years, heroin use and addiction in young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 has doubled, mainly due to the strict guidelines on prescription opioids.

Individuals struggling with heroin use need professional treatment, but some don’t realize help is available until a loved one presents them with the option. If you think your loved one might be using heroin, there are specific signs you can look for.

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nutrition and addiction

Nutrition and Addiction: Can Food Help With Sobriety?

Nutrition and Addiction: The Connection

Addiction is a chronic condition that begins in the brain. This is an important piece of information, as some don’t realize how closely connected addiction and the brain are. Addiction changes the way the brain works, including how neurons communicate via the neural network throughout the body. Once this communication is out of order, the brain has trouble telling different areas of your body how to function and how to feel.

During recovery, the brain begins to heal. Without the right nutrition, however, this process will be slow or even non-existent.

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drug use during pregnancy

Drug Use During Pregnancy Statistics

Drug Use During Pregnancy

Approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States occur without planning. Even if a woman is trying to become pregnant, she likely won’t know about the pregnancy until she is four to six weeks along. Approximately 40 percent of women use substances, such as alcohol, opiates and/or marijuana, and are unable to quit using them even after finding out they are pregnant. What are the implications of drug use during pregnancy? 

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addicted seniors

Addicted Seniors: Talking to Your Parents About Treatment

Are You an Adult Child With an Addicted Parent?

Addicted seniors. It’s a real problem.

If your parents were ill, you’d do anything you needed to in order to help them. Unfortunately, when adult children begin to see their older parents sink into alcoholism or drug addiction, they often are unsure how to approach the situation. It’s difficult to see a 50- or 60-year old parent and come to the realization that they may be an alcoholic or addicted to pain medication; then, to find a way to talk to them about it without damaging the relationship can be very difficult.

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