Trauma therapy

Trauma Therapy: Healing the Root of Addiction

The statistics are startling. One in 6 boys, and 1 in 4 girls, are sexually abused before the age of 18. As a parent, a survivor of childhood sexual trauma, and a person in long term recovery, I know the importance of trauma therapy during addiction treatment firsthand.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, it is estimated that nearly 15 million adolescent children have experienced forced sex. Sexual trauma greatly increases an individual’s risk factor for alcoholism or drug addiction, and setting aside these “official statistics”, I can personally report that every person I was in small group with during my time in treatment, both male and female, vividly reported sexual trauma as a factor.

Healing Sexual Trauma

For me, I believe sexual trauma, left unhealed, would have haunted me and tainted my thought processes for the rest of my life. In the back of my mind I knew, upon entering treatment, that this secret from long ago would resurface and be dealt with. I don’t really remember how my therapist brought it up or what questions were introduced that caused me to begin to uncover this pain, but I do remember the inner work we did together once the details were on the table. Once processed and forgiven, I emerged a new person; healed, whole and at peace with my world.

Gracious Care Recovery Solutions and Trauma Informed Care

Left untreated, sexual trauma (or any type of trauma) can lead to any or all of the following:

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addiction intervention

Addiction Intervention Planning: 5 Things You Need to Say

An addiction intervention isn’t an easy thing to do, but it’s often a necessary one. President Obama once wrote in National Drug Control Strategy that to succeed against addiction, “we will need to rely on the hard work, dedication, and perseverance of every concerned American.” For those who watch their loved ones struggle daily with addiction, these words are fire, burning through their hearts and pushing them to help those around them begin healing.

An addiction intervention takes a good deal of planning, however, as the discussion that occurs can be a tricky and touchy one. Mapping out the conversation in advance and making sure you say the right things can reduce the amount of stress for all involved and help the conversation flow more easily.

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“I Tried to Stay Sober After Detox” and Why This Doesn’t Usually Work

Staying Sober After Detox

Deciding to give up alcohol or drugs is the first step toward recovery. If you’ve been through detox, you may be wondering why you can’t just stop here. Why do you have to spend additional time in a drug treatment center —a.k.a. ‘rehab’? Will it really make all that much of a difference?
Right now, you feel good.
Your head is pretty clear and you’re able to make the right choices to keep you on the path toward recovery.
…or are you?

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chronic relapser

No One is Too Far Gone: Help for the Chronic Relapser

Helping the Chronic Relapser

Addiction can be a complicated and sometimes chronic condition. It can span through decades of a person’s life. For the chronic relapser, addiction can completely change who they are and how they live. It’s the reason so many people struggling with addiction find themselves without a job, home, friends or family. Drug seeking behavior becomes the only motivation, while everything else is cast aside. While studies show that a large number of individuals relapse within the first four years after treatment, it doesn’t have to be this way. There are steps that can be taken to help not only the one-time relapse but the chronic relapser.

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Addiction Rehab: Is Out of State Treatment a Good Idea?

Addiction Rehab: Is Out of State Treatment a Good Idea? 

Choosing to take a positive step toward recovery by attending addiction rehab is important to your future. Deciding on the right rehab is just as vital. The choice you make can affect the treatment you receive and even your chances of remaining sober. One of the biggest questions that most people have when selecting an addiction rehab is whether they should consider out of state treatment. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there isn’t one particular treatment that is appropriate for everyone. Each choice relies on certain factors that will help make the decision right for that individual.
Let’s take a look:

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enabling

Addicted Child? How to Help Without Enabling

Are You Enabling an Addicted Child?

Look for yourself in either of these descriptions:

Enabling Someone in Addiction: Doing something for someone to ease the reality of their consequences. Doing something for someone that they can (and should) do for themselves.
Possible examples: Calling treatment facilities to ask questions about care. Searching the internet for job openings while your child sleeps. Driving someone to obtain illegal substances to help keep them from withdrawal. (The alternative to this last sentence would be to provide information on detox facilities).

Helping Someone in Addiction: Offering support, encouragement or information to help a person begin their journey of recovery.
Possible examples: Visiting a person in treatment during family day. Attending Al-Anon or Nar-Anon in order to understand codependency and to become as healthy as possible for yourself and the family as a whole.

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cravings

5 Easy Steps to Getting Past Addiction Cravings

Addiction cravings are an obsessive desire for a particular thing, whether it’s alcohol, drugs, cigarettes or even sugar. When a person stops using a substance and the physical symptoms of withdrawal are gone, cravings can linger on.

During addiction, the neurons in the brain have been transformed and trained to respond to the chemicals in drugs or alcohol. When you become sober, your brain has a hard time adjusting, and those neurons don’t know how to respond without the drug they have become used to. This leads to cravings.
Here’s some help:

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nutrition and addiction

Nutrition and Addiction: Can Food Help With Sobriety?

Nutrition and Addiction: The Connection

Addiction is a chronic condition that begins in the brain. This is an important piece of information, as some don’t realize how closely connected addiction and the brain are. Addiction changes the way the brain works, including how neurons communicate via the neural network throughout the body. Once this communication is out of order, the brain has trouble telling different areas of your body how to function and how to feel.

During recovery, the brain begins to heal. Without the right nutrition, however, this process will be slow or even non-existent.

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withdrawal

Withdrawal from The First Breath: What Happens to Children Born Into Addiction

Infant Withdrawal: An Epidemic

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a term for a group of problems a newborn experiences when withdrawing from exposure to narcotics.

What Causes Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)?

Drugs taken by a pregnant mother, pass from her bloodstream directly to the fetus. Substances that cause drug dependence in the mother also cause the developing fetus to become addicted. At birth, the baby’s dependence on the substance continues. Since the drug is no longer available, the baby goes into withdrawal. For an infant, withdrawal symptoms are significant and can last up to six months.  

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sponsor relapses

What To Do When Your Sponsor Relapses

I’ve had the same sponsor throughout the entirety of my recovery. Maybe you have too. My sponsor did more than just take me through the steps. She reminded me, through her daily walk, of the person I was called to be.  She has been an example of strength, freedom and wisdom for me. I didn’t call her daily, but she was always there when I needed her.
The sponsor / sponsee relationship is strong. So, how do you handle it if your sponsor relapses?

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